If you have a pup, post its photo and cheer up a young teen fighting cancer: Photo Doggies for Anthony


Haven’t posted here for quite a while as I’ve been concentrating on my other blog, Political-Woman.com.  However, came across this on the news:  Photo Doggies for Anthony.  He’s a young teen fighting cancer and in Phoenix Childrens’ Hospital for chemotherapy.    http://abcnews.go.com/Lifestyle/photo-doggies-anthony-sends-pooch-pics-wishes-phoenix/story?id=28000983

The link to posting a photo can be found here:  https://www.facebook.com/events/1005474049479538/

There but for the grace of God, go I.

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About an-opinioniatedwoman

Midwest, Middle Class and Middle of the Road. A fiscal conservative and social moderate, who supports free speech, gun rights, the military, and God Bless America. Multi-dog owner who has seen and been through it all. Interests from politics to football to cooking/baking to opera. I have a very low tolerance for mediocrity.
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4 Responses to If you have a pup, post its photo and cheer up a young teen fighting cancer: Photo Doggies for Anthony

  1. Adrian says:

    Hi,

    I know it’s been years but I was just wondering how Olympia responded to the hydrotherapy. My beloved chessie is having difficulty walking now because of dysplacia and I’m having trouble deciding whether I should put him down or try something else. He’s a “water dog”, he loved being in the pool when I had one, so I’m wondering if swimming in a big pool will help him.

    Thanks,

    Adrian

  2. Hi Adrian, I tried two types of water therapy with my GSD Olympia. One was in a lap pool that freaked her out, she came out of her life jacket and went under. That was it on that one. Then I tried the shallow tank and she was okay with it in terms of not freaking, but the therapy really didn’t help her, according to the hydro technician, and certainly not from what I could see. Olympia has bilateral hip and one elbow.

    She’s now 6-1/2 years old, and I have kept her on a steady diet of Cosequin DS, 2000 milligrams/day, and the generic form of Rimadyl, known as Novox, that I get through 1-800-PetMeds. Last November, she was diagnosed with Intevertebral Disc disease, and I ended up doing spinal surgery. People told me to put her down, but at 6 yrs of age, I felt if she was willing to fight, I would too. She had the surgery, and is doing quite well, I couldn’t be more pleased.

    You might also try a specialty harness under the brand name, “Blue Dog” “Help ’em up’ which turned out to be a godsend for me and her when she came home after surgery. There’s two lift handles on the harness, one runs parallel on her back and the other on the back end is perpendicular. It enables you to help lift the pup without also adding undue strain on yourself. The harness is in two pieces and is easy to put on if you can keep your pup quiet.

    Good luck, Adrian, and let me know if you have any other questions. We love our pups, don’t we. 🙂

  3. Adrian says:

    Thank you, I will invest in that harness..as well as a wheelchair for him for his daily walks. I was feeling a little hopeless, but after some research I saw that the situation is not hopeless. I’m on a mission to help my 10 year old Chessie as much as I possibly can. He still has a lot of life left..

    Thanks

    • That’s great news! I hope the harness helps both you and your pup. My biggest worry with Olympia has been, “is she in pain” and if so, how to alleviate it. My vet, happens to have a pup herself with dysplasia, among other ailments, and her lab is 11 yrs old. She has her pup on a Rimadyl-type drug, and with Olympia, and occasionally will add a capsule of Gabapentin. I’ve found that this works for Olympia as well, and in no way does she exhibit “druggy” type symptons. I also invested in an Ortho bed that I found on Drs. FosterSmith.com, which she loves. So it sounds as though you and I are both doing whatever we can to keep our pups with us for as long as possible. Good luck to you, and you’re right, the situation with dyplasia is not hopeless. Many dogs live into their teens with the problem.

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